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Asperger's & Autism Counseling

Asperger's Counseling & Autism Counseling

Our approach

Our practice understands that everyone is unique and there isn’t any one way to approach difficulties in life. We use a hybrid approach that is personally tailored to each individual. People who suspect they have Aspergers or Autism are likely already pretty hard on themselves. Our goal is to help them to build on their gifts and work on strategies to overcome the trickier parts.

experience you can trust

Personal experience allows us to help others find the right methods that will help them with their their ASD. We understand how it affects peoples lives, relationships, and work experience. Through this they have developed a deep understanding of the gifts and frustrations of life with ASD.

Asperger's treatment

Our practice understands that everyone is unique and there isn’t any one way to approach difficulties in life. We use a hybrid approach that is personally tailored to each individual. People who suspect they have Asperger’s or Autism are likely already pretty hard on themselves. Our goal is to help them to build on their gifts and work on strategies to overcome the trickier parts.

COMMON QUESTIONS

ASD Counseling

Asperger’s syndrome (also known as Asperger’s Disorder) was first described in the 1940s by Viennese pediatrician Hans Asperger, who observed autism-like behaviors and difficulties with social and communication skills in boys who had normal intelligence and language development. Many professionals felt Asperger’s syndrome was simply a milder form of autism and used the term “high-functioning autism” to describe these individuals. Uta Frith, a professor at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience of University College London and editor of Autism and Asperger Syndrome, describes individuals with Asperger’s as “having a dash of autism.”

Asperger’s Disorder was added to the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) in 1994 as a separate disorder from autism. However, there are still many professionals who consider Asperger’s Disorder a less severe form of autism. In 2013, the DSM-5 replaced Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder and other pervasive developmental disorders with the umbrella diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder.

  • Not point at objects to show interest (for example, not point at an airplane flying over)
  • Not look at objects when another person points at them
  • Have trouble relating to others or not have an interest in other people at all
  • Avoid eye contact and want to be alone
  • Have trouble understanding other people’s feelings or talking about their own feelings
  • Prefer not to be held or cuddled, or might cuddle only when they want to
  • Appear to be unaware when people talk to them, but respond to other sounds
  • Be very interested in people, but not know how to talk, play, or relate to them
  • Repeat or echo words or phrases said to them, or repeat words or phrases in place of normal language
  • Have trouble expressing their needs using typical words or motions
  • Not play “pretend” games (for example, not pretend to “feed” a doll)
  • Repeat actions over and over again
  • Have trouble adapting when a routine changes
  • Have unusual reactions to the way things smell, taste, look, feel, or sound
  • Lose skills they once had (for example, stop saying words they were using)

Behavior Treatments – This treatment focused on teaching applicable skills and behaviors while reducing or eliminating negative, dysfunctional habits. They must be consistent and ensue in all suitable settings.

Mindfulness – “The intentional, accepting and non-judgmental focus of one’s attention on the emotions, thoughts and sensations occurring in the present moment.” What this means is working to build our awareness of our inner world and work to not have negative emotions or stimulus flood and overwhelm us.

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy – CBT and stress management are important because they help the child or adult with Asperger’s learn to deal with anxiety, anger and obsessions. Therapists usually use two principal methods of behavior therapy to advance self-help skills and decrease the occurrence of self-harm activities.

Modeling – this involves a demonstration of a desired skill or behavior, and then directing or encouraging the Asperger’s person to duplicate it. Modeling is useful behavior treatment in nearly all settings.

Enhancing Social Competence – social skills are taught using a variety of methods and settings such as: friendship groups at school, classroom activities, group therapy programs, buddy or mentoring programs, and peer therapy.

Targeted Intervention Strategies – recently interventions studies focused on teaching distinct aspects of social aptitude, such as joint attention, emotion recognition, and theory of mind abilities.

Important to Remember – Most important to consider is that when it comes to behavior treatments, everyone in the Asperger’s person’s life must make an effort to work jointly as a team. Parents, mental health professionals, pediatricians, neurologist, educators, occupational therapists, and other professionals must all cooperate to make sure everyone involved meets the person’s needs.

There is no blood test to diagnose autism spectrum disorder. A diagnosis is made based on behaviors. In order to be diagnosed with autism, an individual must display deficits in social communication and social interaction, and show restrictive and repetitive behaviors.

Asperger syndrome (AS), also known as Asperger’s, is a developmental disorder characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction and nonverbal communication, along with restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. Autism, or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), refers to a broad range of conditions characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech and nonverbal communication. According to the Centers for Disease Control, autism affects an estimated 1 in 59 children in the United States today.

There is no known single cause for autism spectrum disorder, but it is generally accepted that it is caused by abnormalities in brain structure or function. Brain scans show differences in the shape and structure of the brain in children with autism compared to in neurotypical children.

There is no cure for autism spectrum disorder, and there’s currently no medication to treat it. But some medicines can help with related symptoms like depression, seizures, insomnia, and trouble focusing. Studies have shown that medication is most effective when it’s combined with behavioral therapies.

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Curious if You have ASD?

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ASD RESOURCES

Below are some posts on ASD that may be helpful to you in your quest to learn more for yourself or those you love.

CLIENT TESTIMONIALS